Comments

  • Going Blonde Day
    Glad to see you back Linda, and thank you for your kind comments about the people in here. They've been very good to me, too.

    God bless and love,

    Ginger
  • Going Blonde Day
    I do, too, Alice, and not only because I'm a gentleman (gentlemen prefer blondes you know <rolling eyes>), but because I'm about to become one myself! (lol)

    I think I speak for many of the other members here, that we hope you'll post some photos of you wearing your blonde wigs.

    God bless and love,

    Ginger (or Larry if you must <grin>), your wig sibling (I have boy parts so I can't be your wig sister).
  • Going Blonde Day
    [[[Alice]]] Thank you so much, Alice! The kindness you and all the others on this forum have shone, and continue to show me is one of the ways God feeds me spiritually - I cannot put a price on how valuable the love I get here is.

    Yes, there will be photos from going blonde day! Even if my peroxide in crime isn't comfortable with having photos of herself after going blonde, I'll post photos of me anyway, but I'm sure she'll not mind me posting some of her (not to mention the both of us doing before and after poses).

    God bless and love,

    Ginger (or Larry - if I have to! lol)
  • Going Blonde Day
    Hi everyone; it's nice to see some activity here this week!

    Diana thank you so much for your kind, uplifting words. I need all the support and encouragement I can get. I also admire the work that you do - you must live with a lot of stress just doing your job much less being "trash talked about" by your colleagues. Thank you so much for being a part of this group and sharing the gift of just being you with us.

    Although I'm only 58 I live in a senior's retirement community (I'll save how I came to be here for another time). You'd think that people at this time of their lives would have acquired maturity and wisdom, but you'd be dead wrong. These people act like they're back in high school! They form little cliques, and trash talk other people because the only way they can "build" themselves up, is by tearing other people down. They try to hang all sorts of labels on me from 'weirdo' to 'queer.' I think that negativity comes from being afraid of something new or different, and often when they learn the how and why I wear wigs changes their attitude toward me. Not all of them do, of course; nor do I "owe" anyone an explanation for anything I do. On the other hand, when I decided to wear wigs again I asked my priest if that would be a problem because I didn't want to be a "distraction." He knew about my work with people with alopecia areata and had even read my essay, "A Special Wardrobe," so I wasn't surprised when he said, "of course you can wear your wigs!" The fact that his Dad wore a hair replacement system probably didn't hurt (grin). So I'm just going to do my thing, try not to let the slurs get me down, and treasure the kind words of support and affirmation I do get - such as from you all - wear my t-shirt that says, "wig empowerment day" on it, and try to help others along the way.

    No, we haven't had going blonde day yet - our stylist is recovering from COVID! I've decided to assume that going blonde day is going to be a success, and so I'm having matching t-shirts made with the words,"We may be new blondes, but we're definitely having more fun!" What do y'all think - too silly or too cheesy?

    God bless and love,

    Ginger (or Larry)
  • Going Blonde Day
    It's always great to get feedback from two of the loveliest ladies on this forum.You are always supportive and encouraging, and it's greatly appreciated. My lifestyle is of loving being bald, but also loving wearing wigs is unusual and I catch a lot of flak about it.

    Just as important, is how God uses me and my unusual way of life to help others. When I get positive comments from wig wearers, I'm able to rise above the hateful slurs and labels I get all the time. I hope I'm not being presumptive in considering the two of you as good friends.

    God bless and love,

    Ginger (or Larry).
  • Going Blonde Day
    I love you, Tav! Whenever I find a message left by you, it always makes my day!

    I'm glad you think I look good with light auburn hair. It was the most popular color of the wigs I wore back in school. I have a cousin who has the same eye color and skin tones that I do, and while my hair is brown, her's is light auburn just like my wig both the one then, and the one I have now.

    ***

    As of now, "going blonde day" is still on. And yes, I'll put up photos!

    God bless and love,

    Ginger (or Larry)
  • Dating a man with a toupée - now I've heard it all
    Here is my experience (for what it's worth).

    I've encountered women who dislike men who are bald so much, that they wouldn't want to date a bald man or even want to be friends with one.

    On the other hand, there are some women who are crazy attracted to bald men. I've met a couple and while it was nice that they took a shine to my bald head (bad pun intended), we didn't match up on the important things in having a deep,and loving relationship.

    I've met women who liked me bald but hated my wigs. My experience and research indicates that women who dislike toupees, think men who wear them are insecure and lack confidence.

    Because I love being bald and wearing wigs (they are an important form of self expression for me), so if I pursue a romantic relationship, a woman has to love me bald or wigged.

    In addition to providing ways of ministering others with self esteem issues (and not just baldness), wearing wigs are a part of who I am. They may not have either helped or hindered my love life, I make friends with women a lot easier. Women love to talk about hair, and so wigs have provided a mutual interest. I'm constantly sought out to give advice and opinions such as "Should I cut my hair a lot shorter?", "Would I look good if I dyed my hair red?" I have no idea how I became an expert on hair, except (maybe) that I've had to become well read on hair and wigs for my own need to know about these things myself.

    Bottom line: for me going bald, and later wearing wigs, has been a blessing. I wish I had something really profound to say, but don't . . . except this: find your way to wearing hair pieces if that's something you want to do. Most of all, I hope you and other Christians will talk about this with our Father in Heaven.

    God bless and love,

    Larry
  • Being Different
    I don't know if this is relatable or not, but I don't get grief about wanting to wear a wig, but that I wear different wigs or no wig. The assumption most people have is that like the overwhelming majority of men, I want to wear wigs because I'm ashamed or self conscious about losing my hair.

    I don't want a prostheses, as in a hair replacement system. I love my bald head -- I just enjoy having a variety of looks, and wigs allow me the option of having hair or not having hair; and having hair of different colors, styles and lengths pleases me . .. but so does having my head rubbed or kissed (especially when it's been freshly shaved) also pleases me. I don't see why I have to choose only one of the two.

    God bless and love,

    Larry
  • Being Different

    Hi Linda,

    Thanks for remembering me. I've been around. I follow this blog faithfully and I do make the occasional comment, and even ask relevant questions. I hope you and the others here know how much I like to "pen pal" and I'd like to hear how you're doing -- both the good as well as the bad. I had a pretty good day today. One of the care givers told me she thought my hair looked nice today. Even though she knows it was a wig, she knew it would please me more by saying your hair -- not your wig -- looks nice today.

    It was a silly little thing to say, but it meant a lot for some reason. I don't think she knows my back story,we've never spoken before -- I don't even know her name!



    Hey Keith,

    Sorry for the delay in responding to your message.

    I’d be glad to “listen” to anything you need to talk about. I’m a little confused as to whether you want to wear toupees or wigs. A toupee is a hair piece that covers the balding area of the scalp; if you don’t have a bald spot or patch, how do you choose what size toupee to buy and/or have made for you. After covering the bald area, the hair (or synthetic fibres) are then combed in to the existing hair still growing on the scalp. You can’t wear toupees that are a different color than your natural hair. Perhaps like a lot of people, you’ve been thinking that “toupee” is a term used for all hair pieces for men, and that “wig” is the term used for all hair pieces made for women. These terms aren’t descriptive for the gender of who a hair piece has been made for. If the hair piece covers the whole scalp then it’s a wig – albeit a men’s wig or a woman’s wig. As to whether or not women wear toupees, I’m not sure about. If they have a bald spot or patch that isn’t too large, the ladies often wear hair pieces called “toppers.” Toppers are the same color of the woman’s hair as they are suppose to blend with their existing natural hair. In the ’60s when women started wearing wigs, those with short hair often wore a “fall” or an attachable pony tail. These created the illusion that a woman had long hair, when a woman actually had short hair. Today’s toppers now also include bangs, buns, and braids.

    I hope this helps.

    God bless and love,

    Larry
  • Being Different

    Sorry for the delay in writing back, (my internet server has been "spotty" over the past few days); because I wear a variety of wigs -- not to mention the days I don't wear one at all -- I don't have the option of only telling certain people that I wear wigs. It's pretty much in everyone and their brother's face that I wear wigs.

    I live in a senior citizen's condo community so there are precious few secrets here as you can imagine. How did I end up here? In 2013, I had to go on disability, at the same time Dad was diagnosed with Altzeimer's (however you spell it), and so to save money and help Mom take care of Dad I moved back home. In November 2015 (Dad had died the previous March), Mom and I moved here ("Crescent Heights"). When she died unexpectantly a year later, Management said I could stay if I wanted to even though I was a few years short of being the minimum age of 55. There are a lot of "goodies" that comes with being a resident here -- not too mention Management's offer of reducing my rent by $200, and my money was clearly "old enough" to be accepted, so I've stayed. I still drive so when the walls start to close in, I can hop into my Jeep and visit friends, family, and continue attending my Church that I love. Pets are allowed so I have my little girl, "Georgia" for company. . . . but I seriously digress.

    I have found that when most people learn how I came to wear wigs, usually after reading my essay, "A Special Wardrobe" it changes their attitude. I'm no longer that weirdo bald guy who wears different colored wigs - I'm that advocate guy who helped and continues to help people coping with hair loss problems as well as anyone else with self esteem issues that aren't related to baldness.

    Unfortunately, not everyone knows my "back story;" and I shouldn't have to "educate" people before they treat me with respect. And, of course, some don't change their opinion of me even if they do know my "back story." In some ways living here is like being back in high school: there are your little cliques, and some people can only build themselves up by tearing others down. Some time it gets to me, and then I come here and bore you people when I'm disrespected and get my feelings hurt.

    God bless and love,

    Larry
  • Being Different

    Again, I think similar thoughts as you, Tav. I grew up in a pretty conservative home (meaning I wasn't aloud to wear my hair long), which is why I chose the wig you see me wearing now for several reasons - one of them was because it's longer than my hair was when I was a teen-ager. I just turned 58, so better late than never. I know a lot of people don't like it (I even over heard a friend say, "he's wearing that awful red wig today." (sigh). She felt really bad when I told her I was able to hear what she said.

    I've always done what I like, regardless of what others think. Some times it's come with a cost . . . but some times I've been rewarded.for doing things my way. Still, even though I ought to know better, I tend to think about the one negative comment instead of the seven (or however many) positive comments. It does help a lot when I reflect on all the good God has done through me to help people with self esteem issues because I have done things my way; and so as far as wigs go, I still say: "My hair, my head, my wig, my say!"

    God bless and love,

    Larry
  • Being Different
    Thanks for your kind words, Tav -- you're a woman after my heart.

    I've always wanted to wear wigs,especially after getting involved working with women who have alopecia areata.

    Like you, I love wearing wigs because of fun and fashion. I also enjoy the satisfaction I get out of helping people with self esteem issues. I do wish I had friends who wear wigs so we could share not only the bad experiences, but also the good ones. Giving and getting positive opinions, advice and information about wigs would be wonderful to.

    God bless and love,

    Larry
  • So excited to be a new member!
    Hi HairLove,
    Welcome to the group. I think you already see that you have found a special place where you are definitely welcome!
  • Sharing something Good
    Lol thanks Tav, it's always nice to hear from you.

    Ginger :wink:
  • I Need Some Encouragement and Support

    Thanks for sending the message, Tav -- it's never to late to post comments or send emails to me, and so if you (or anyone else reading this <grin>, want to write to me about anything please feel free to do so.

    I'm sorry you are having so much trouble with your bio hair. What you've said doesn't surprise me though. From what I've read and from talking to chemo "survivors", most are surprised that bio hair can significantly change from pre chemo to post chemo. Most experience a change in color. This can be that they have a lot of gray now, but had no grays before, to some people who had brown hair before,now have red hair. Changes in texture and curliness are even more common experiences, so you're not alone in what you're going through.

    I am surprised by the number of women of women that continue to wear wigs after their hair grows back from chemo, even if the regrown hair looks the same as it did before. "That's the problem, Larry," said a lady to me over the phone, "I hated my hair before chemo, and now that it's back it's still too thin and fine!"

    I'm sorry that she discovered the benefits of wigs from having had cancer, and gone through chemo, but she is neither the first nor the last woman who has decided to continue wearing wigs even after their hair grew back. If you enjoy wearing wigs, then please do so. It's not hurting anyone, and if they make you feel better about your self, then don't let anyone stop you from wearing them.

    God bless,

    Larry
  • I Need Some Encouragement and Support
    Thank you, Cici.

    I've been doing what you have suggested. It's not easy some times, so getting a kind word of approval and support means a lot -- a lot more than I can say.

    I think where I'm living is a factor.

    Even though I'm only 55, I live in a seniors community. How I ended up here is a long story. I've discovered that most elderly people don't have filters, and if they don't like something they aren't shy about making their feelings known. It doesn't help that about 70% of the residents have some degree of dementia. They aren't happy about change, and aren't tolerant with people who have a life style that's not "normal."

    So what is this "lifestyle" of mine that's got a whole lot of old people bent out of shape?

    Although I love being bald, so much so that I shave my head to make it completely smooth, I also love to wear wigs because having hair can be nice to. Wigs allow me to be "haired" as well as bald, and I'm not limited to just one color or style. Simply put, I like to wear wigs because it's fun! The women I date like me bald or "wigged" because they enjoy my variety of looks I have; indeed, some of them start wearing wigs to and for the same reason. My wigs help me make friends with women a lot easier, and both men as well as women want to talk to me about their problems -- especially after they learn about my work with women who had alopecia areata when I was in college. Most important of all is how God has used my experiences with baldness and wigs in several ministries.

    You'd think that my life living with senior citizens would be sweet, but you'd be wrong. Many ask questions about why I'm wearing wigs, but will turn away without waiting to hear all of my answer to their questions. Why? Because what I do isn't "normal." Others hear distorted versions of my stories and experiences, and they basically shun me. I've been called many derogatory names and accused of doing some very strange things. Some have minds that are lost in the fog of dementia, and others have hearing problems. You have got to remember that this is my home now -- a place to be comfortable, a place that's safe, and a place where people patiently help one another. I have to get in my car and go to friends and extended family for those things.

    God bless you all,

    Larry
  • I Need Some Encouragement and Support
    Thanks Taylor,
    I get excited when I get a new wig to.
    God bless,
    Larry
  • I Need Some Encouragement and Support
    Thank you, Taylor.

    Normally getting static from other people has never been a problem, but I've had changes in the circumstances of my life.

    Even though I'm only 55, I live in a senior citizen's apartment community. How I ended up here is a long story which I won't bore you with. I take meals in a common cafeteria, so I'm living "cheek by jowl" with a lot of folks who have no filter on what they say good or bad.

    Now as I've said in other posts, I started wearing wigs again after a twenty year break. While I was taking a college course, I had to create a peer support group. I chose to do one for people with alopecia areata. That was when I first starting wearing wigs. Some of my friends and women I dated loved my wigs, others hated them. Well, I loved them! I liked the variety of looks I had (I had different colors, different lengths, and different styles), I liked how I made more women friends, and most of all I liked how God was using me and my unusual life style to help people with all kinds of self esteem issues. He took a college project and turned it into a ministry, and because I'm a Christian that was a wonderful blessing. So, even though I love my bald head, with wigs I could enjoy having hair, too. I wrote an essay about that experience called, "A Special Wardrobe." I've posted it on various web sites (including this one), so some of you have read it. If you haven't but would like a copy, please feel free to email me for one.

    For a number of reasons I stopped wearing them -- until last year. While talking to an old and dear friend from those days on the telephone, she asked if I still wore my wigs. When she asked me why, I told her that I didn't have a ministry any more that wearing wigs would be helpful.

    There was a moment of silence. She then said, "Larry, you don't have to have a ministry to justify wearing wigs. We both know you'd like to, and that is reason enough. I had to admit she was right. We made plans to get together, and the last thing she said was, "Now, when I get down there, you'd better be ginger when I see you!" One of my best and favorite wigs from those days was light auburn. That even became sort of a nick name, and in private I have to admit that I liked it.

    So last year I started wearing wigs again, and after not wearing them for so long, it felt like it was for the first time. The reaction of the residents here has been different than when I did it before. They don't hesitate in telling me what they think, good or bad. I don't know if it's because they are elderly, the ones who don't like them don't pull punches. I have a core group of friends both here and at my Church that are very supportive. In fact, when I asked my Priest if I could wear wigs to church (I didn't want them to be a distraction so I wanted his approval first. He knew my story of wearing wigs in the past, so he not only approved, he insisted that I wear them lol). Another good thing about wearing wigs this time, is that I have a stylist helping me. She thinks it's great that I want to wear wigs, and she even comes here to do my wigs. And yes . . . the first one I bought was light auburn, and I'm starting to be called "Ginger" again by some of my lady friends. When my friend came to see me, they heard her call me that, and they call me that because they like to make me blush (rolling eyes).

    You'd think I'd be twelve kinds of happy wearing wigs again. For the most part I am. The reason I asked you all for some encouragement, is because I'm sort of shocked by the anger and hate I'm getting from those who don't like me wearing wigs. Some of the negative remarks can be down right hateful and nasty, and I wasn't expecting that.

    Thanks for letting me ramble on.

    God bless and love,

    Larry
  • Got my wig -Stop Traffic!
    I think you look lovely.
    Every once in a while a person gets a wig that really suits them. I think for you, this is one of those wigs.
    Thanks for letting us see you. I for one, love watching when a woman finds yet another way to express her beauty.
    Larry
  • silver or blond?
    Even though I'm 55, the color of my newest wig is soft pewter with dark roots. I wasn't sure if I was old enough to make it work for me. My stylist reminded me that a lot of people start to go grey in their 30s, and she said that it would look good on me.

    So I tried it. . . loved how it looked after my stylist trimmed it up for me . . . and the positive feedback I got from the people in my life was over whelming. I've gotten more compliments with this new wig, than any wig I've ever owned. I think I understand what they mean when they say gray is the new blonde (lol). Don't forget, we're talking about wigs, so if you don't like what you see, just take it off. :wink:

    God bless,

    Larry
  • Advice needed please
    Hi, thanks for your feedback.

    Larry
  • Advice needed please
    Thank you for being polite enough to respond; I'm surprised at the number of people who don't.

    I'm sorry about your work hours and schedule. When I was working, it was at a funeral home and I was there 12 hours a day, seven days a week.

    Take care of yourself and God bless,

    Larry
  • Online wig stores
    Thanks everyone for the feedback.

    Larry
  • Advice needed please
    Not to beat a dead horse, but since I'm an openly bald, wig wearing person, I love to get compliments like, "oh, Larry, I really love that one." If I kept wearing wigs a secret, or if people knew but thought I was self conscience about wearing them, I'd miss out on getting compliments. I'm not telling you what to do, just offering you something to think about.

    God bless,

    Larry
  • Opinions from Men
    Thank you Taylor. I appreciate your kind words. My experiences here at this forum have been for the most part have been great. There were several women who took exception to my being here, only because I'm a guy, and they felt I was in their territory. Fortunately, that was some time ago, and I've not had any more trouble because of that. I did get an email once from someone who was not happy that I'm not a homosexual, and I have no idea what set him or her off.

    My reason for being here is pretty simple -- I like to wear wigs. As much as I like my bald head, I don't understand why I can't wear hair when I feel like it. Now one of the good things I discovered when I began wearing wigs, is that I've made a lot more friendships with women. None of my male friends wear wigs and care only about hair if they are losing their's. I'm here because wigs are an important part of my self esteem and identity, and women seem to know or understand that. So, that's pretty much why I'm here. I just want to talk, and share stories and experiences with others who are like me. The overwhelming number of people who wear wigs are women. It's really that simple -- no conspiracies or hidden agendas. I do sometimes get made fun of, or get insulted, so I like coming here and other similar rooms when I need some encouragement or a kind word of support. So, thanks again, Taylor, you've really made my day.

    God bless,

    Larry
  • Online wig stores
    Thanks for the information.

    God bless,

    Larry
  • Opinions from Men
    [[[Sonjia]]]

    I'm always so happy and pleased when I discover a sibling in Christ who shares an interest of mine.

    I read your profile, and while it's great that your husband helps you to hide your "bald spot" as you call it, I'm sad he doesn't share in the joy you've found in wearing wigs. Maybe he'll come around in time when he sees and understands the needs you have are met by wearing wigs. As a guy I don't understand his attitude. I'm thrilled when women I date have started to wear wigs -- usually because they not only have seen me in my different wigs, but because they get why I wear them. Has every woman in my life liked my wigs? Of course not, but more women like me either bald or wigged than women who don't -- a lot more I'm happy to say. Some who didn't at first later became supportive when they've seen how my writings have been used by God to help people with self esteem issues, and not just those who've got issues related to hair loss. On my profile for this forum, I include my most Holy Spirit inspired essays, "A Special Wardrobe." It's not because I think of myself as some great writer that I like it so much, but rather the honor that He used me, and the writing skills He bestowed upon me, to help hurting people. For a Christian, what greater or more rewarding experience is there?

    It's not always easy, even now after wearing wigs for so many years, I get insulted, made fun of, and my feelings can be hurt. I may be on the road to becoming Christ-like, but I'm still human and can feel the pain when I'm being abused.

    I hope you'll feel free to ask me any questions you may have, or if you just want to chat. I'm disabled, so I don't get out as much as I'd like, which is why I like talking to people online.

    God bless and love,

    Larry

    PS I don't think you have a big head at all.
  • Can Older Women Rock Long Hair?
    Hi Amy,

    I'm not sure if you'd care to get an opinion from a Gentleman, but I feel strongly about this issue that I had to reply.
    In addition to what others have said, I think you look lovely in the photos showing you with long hair. I would like to add a few comments of my own.
    First of all, who came up with a "rule" that women shouldn't wear their long, and why do ladies go along with that, and treat it as Gospel?
    Secondly, not every long wig will look good on you. A number of my lady friends learned this lesson when they went blonde. Not every shade of blonde will not look good on every body. Things to consider are length, style, cut, curl, color, and facial features.
    Lastly, have a stylist who can cut, color (human hair only), and style wigs. I recommend every wig wearer to have a stylist. My stylist cuts and restyles every wig I have (not to mention preventing me from making, er, uhm, questionable choices to start with). When she's done, it may no longer look exactly like the picture on the box, but it still is long (if a long wig is what I wanted), but it now works together with my unique bone structure of my face.
    One more thing. This is old news to many people in here I'm sure, but if you think you're more beautiful with long hair, blonde hair, or whatever else hair, you are more beautiful (if you have your stylist personalize your wig). Confidence is one of the most important beauty secrets everyone needs.
    God bless,
    Larry
  • Advice needed please
    Ooops! I should have read all my mail before replying, so I'd have known you've already met with your friends. Oh well, I'll crawl away embarrassed now. But I'm very proud and happy for you!

    God bless,
    Larry
  • Advice needed please
    I was just glad that I was helpful.

    I can relate somewhat with what you're going through. I took a twenty year break from wearing wigs. If you read my profile it contains an essay how I got into wearing wigs.

    Recently a friend from those days asked if I still wore wigs. When she asked me why, I said that I didn't have a ministry and so I didn't have a good reason for wearing them any more. She took my hand and she reminded me how much I loved wearing them. As much as I love my totally bald head, both then and now, I love being wigged, to. "And that," my friend said, "is reason enough to wear them again."

    So, here I am, a fifty-five year old man, living in a retirement community, shows up at meals, bald, blonde, a brunette or a red head. The first day was hard. My first new wig was awful, but I now have a stylist who keeps me from making bad choices (lol). When asked why I was wearing wigs, I said I loved variety. I also said I wore them to draw attention to various causes and issues such as breast cancer awareness (my Mom and sister are survivors), and alopecia areata among others (despite what my friend said, I still felt I needed a reason to wear wigs, besides just wanting to. Despite starting off with a bad wig, the experience has been as rewarding as when I used to wear them years ago. I hope that you will discover the joy and fun of wearing wigs, unafraid, confident and happy. You don't have to do what I've done. If you are a one wig or one color woman, that's fine! Remember these are your friends, and I'd bet the butter and egg money that some of them will want to tr wigs and want you to help them.

    God bless and love,

    Larry

    PS I've written a book on wigs, hair loss and self esteem. Would you mind looking at some of it and tell me what you think?